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Archive for March, 2009

 

grubbs

My headstone of the week isn’t.  My headstone of the week is actually headstones of the week!  I found these four, unmarked, worn headstones in Grubbs Churchyard in Chapman Township, Snyder County, Pennsylvania.  My 5th great grandfather, his wife, their daughter and her husband (my 4th great grandparents) are buried in this cemetery, however these are not their headstones. 

I have no idea who these markers memorialize, but I was taken by the simplicity and sameness of them.

Linda’s headstone of the week; Week #23

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Well, THE INTERVIEW was aired very-y-y-y early this morning, and as I thought, I appeared nervous! Although talking to Lori Burkholder, the reporter, was like talking to friend, the fact that the camera was there was ever present in my mind!

See for yourself . . . but don’t judge Linda by her first TV appearance! Well, first if you don’t count the appearance when I met Richard Nixon at Ontario, California Airport on the eve of his election! (Can’t help it folks! I had to be a Young Republican since I came from a family of staunch, life-long Republicans. I was incognito, though because I was dressed in an Elephant Suit!)

It was a wonderful experience, but doubtful I’ll be contacted for a permanent position!

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In the rain, covered by an umbrella, Graveyard Rabbit Linda talked about graveyards and Graveyard Rabbits, in of all places, a Graveyard!  I had been contacted by Lori Burkholder of WGAL, the local NBC affiliate, about my Graveyard Rabbit Blog because she was interested in doing a piece on it.  We agreed on Thursday, I printed information for her and headed to Lancaster Cemetery with my sidekick, Jim, to meet the crew.

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We started at Charles Demuth’s grave where we talked about the artist, what I look for in cemetries, etc., and then headed over to see a beautiful monument  for a 17 year old boy, across the way.  I’ll do a blog on this monument at a later time.

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From the Hartman site we walked to the front of the cemetery in the rain, of course, as I pointed out elements on headstones, anchor on this one, well known Lancaster names on others, and finally reached the huge Reynolds site.  

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General John Fulton Reynolds, had the misfortune of dying the first day of Gettysburg, after going through the likes of Chancellorsville, Rogue River, Mechanicsville, Second Bull Run, Fredericksburg, and Gaines Mills.  Blog will be coming on this site in the future, too.  We talked about several interesting headstones and monuments in the area and slowly walked back to our vehicles.  We took a few pictures, shook hands and bid each adieu after spending almost an hour with the delightful news crew from Channel 8!

Watch for the interview on Monday, the 23rd to see if Linda blows it. . . . 

 

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I actually had seen my headstone of the week on a previous visit to California, but didn’t have a picture “good enough” to post.  I found it in Hermosa Cemetery in Colton, California when I was looking for Morgan Earp’s headstone.

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Among all the monuments, flat stones and memorials, this one stood out as unique in my eyes.  The simplicity and shape made it appear as almost home made.  The name and date were almost as those they had been scratched in cement, with a fading stenciled name under it.  I was impressed and had to make it my headstone of the week.

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The inscription simply reads:

Arturo Bejarano
Octubre 11, 1925
Agosto 22, 1932 

The stencil reads:  

Art Bejarano

 

If you are ever in the Colton area, this is an interesting Cemetery, with a variety of headstones shaded by mature trees.  This headstone stands out as one of the most interesting in my opinion, and the reason it is

Linda’s Headstone of the Week; Week #22

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Lancaster Pennsylvania’s Graveyard Rabbit Linda took a one week trip to California to see family and to get a few things from Mother’s home before the sale . While in California she had the opportunity to meet Graveyard Rabbit Diane and we hopped from graveyard to graveyard and then strolled through each of them!  

We started at “Diane’s Cemetery,” Sunnyslope in Corona, went on to Sherman Indian School Cemetery and ended up at Olivewood Cemetery in the heart of Riverside.  At the second graveyard, Sherman Indian School Cemetery, we recorded our visit and I am now sharing it with the rest of you bunnies out there.  Diane has already written a blog on it, and may even write another after this visit . . . hmmmmmm-m-m-m

We’ll start with Diane:

Graveyard Rabbit Diane

Graveyard Rabbit Diane

Is it just me, or does it seem odd that this beautiful monument is at the back gate and not facing the arch and wide gate on the street side?

Graveyard Rabbit Linda

Graveyard Rabbit Linda

Bunny Linda may not be as tall and photogenic as Bunny Diane, but rest assured nobody could have enjoyed herself more!  We both saw different things in the Cemeteries, looking at the same thing.  I’ve come to believe maybe we should always take a buddy with us to get a another’s perspective when we hop from place to place ~ what do you think?

Old headstone, nail and new headstone.

Old headstone, nail and new headstone.

All of the headstones were alike and none of them had a name on it, with the exception of some that I’ll mention later.  In the front of each one of them was what appeared to be a rusted nail, with the head the size of a penny.  (Look hard in the above picture, you’ll see it!)  I tried to clean off the top, thinking perhaps they were numbered, but without a brush or some cleaning agent, I was unable to do it ~ simple spit on the end of my finger didn’t cut it!  The nail was between what remained of the original headstone and the new headstone.  What do you think the nail was?  Diane and I’d be interested . . . 

Example of the new, uniform headstone

Example of the new, uniform headstone

There were a few headstones with names on them and they were either in front or in back of the generic, uniform headstone.  My personal opinion is that the family placed them, so their child’s grave is marked.  

A view of the graveyard

A view of the graveyard

 These two pictures (above and below these two paragraphs) are two pictures that show the uniqueness of this cemetery.  Some of the graves have been forgotten over the years, with children separated from parents by miles and states, and others have not been forgotten with stones and plastic flowers, to keep the color alive!  

You’ll also notice an arch of rebar around one of the older headstones in the right front of the above picture.  Scattered throughout the Cemetery, there were several of these.  Some of them still had the cement from the old headstone attached.

Rememberances

Remembrances

My favorite photograph of the day shows the spirit with which we embraced our hopping.  My new bunny buddy was kicking dirt off of one of the nails, but to me, she appears to be dancing!  For this reason, I’ve called this picture ~ “Dancing on a Grave!”

Dancin' on Your Grave!

Dancin' on Your Grave!

I’ve found a new friend and know that when I go back to California (and I go several times a year to visit family) I have a playmate!   Keep that Blue Bug fired up and ready to go, Diane!

 . . . so many cemeteries; so little time!

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The Great Trainwreck of 1907

The Great Trainwreck of 1907

 

I’m a bit late posting my headstone of the week ~ I’ve been in California, seeing family and playing with another GY Rabbit! . . . but Diane told you about that, and I’ll tell you more later.

While in California, I went back to Hermosa Cemetery in Colton to take another picture of a headstone I had photographed and found a monument I had not seen on my last visit.  Another community memorializing a tragic event and honoring those unknown to them.  It impressed me.

I decided this had to be my “Headstone of the Week” for Week 21. 

IN MEMORY OF THOSE WHO PERISHED IN THE GREAT TRAINWRECK
OF THE SUNSET EXPRESS. THIS TRAGEDY OCCURRED IN THE
COLTON RAILROAD YARD MARCH 28, 1907.

AMONG THE TWENTY FOUR WHO DIED EIGHTEEN WERE ITALIAN IMMIGRANTS TRAVELING FROM GENOA, ITALY TO JOBS AWAITING
THEM IN SAN FRANCISCO, SOME OF WHOM ARE BURIED
IN THIS AREA WHERE YOU NOW STAND.
GUISEPPI CANNERATI, GIOVANNI GRAFFO, CIRIACO DELAPINA,
PATOLA FILABERTA, CARLO FACONDINI, DOMINICA GALLA,
FELICE DRUIDI, FRANCISCO BARSI, GUISEFFI L’GURE, LARGE SMITH
AND FIVE ADDITIONAL MALE ITALIANS NAMES UNKNOWN.
RIPOSINO IN PACE
DEDICATED DECEMBER 6, 2007

 

Linda’s Headstone of the Week; Week #21

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On a trip to Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, last summer we stayed at a Bed and Breakfast in neighboring town, Charles Town. The Bed and Breakfast and town was very historical and a walk through town, educational. Just a couple blocks from the home was the historic, Zion Episcopal Church, founded in 1815. The graveyard surrounding it was beautiful, and my “headstone” for this week was found in it.  

Murphy Monument, Charlestown, West Virginia

Murphy Monument, Charlestown, West Virginia

My headstone for week #20 may not actually a headstone.  It may be a site marker for the Murphy plot, and it is beautful!  Murphy was the only word I can find on this monument, however. There are three “Murphys” buried here, Elsie Bogardus Murphy, 1881-1965; Helena Platt Murphy, 1860-1926; and Simon J. Murphy, 1851-1926.  The picture below shows the whole story and the picture above, a close up of the monument so you can see the detail on it.

Zion Episcopal Cemetery, Charlestown, West Virginia

Zion Episcopal Cemetery, Charlestown, West Virginia

Linda’s Headstone of the Week; Week #20.

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